Q&A with Pryce Gases Chairman Salvador Escaño on Turnaround Strategy

Q&A with Pryce Gases Chairman Salvador Escaño on Turnaround Strategy

interviews, Q&A
Salvador Escaño is Chairman and CEO of Pryce Gases Inc., the leading LPG supplier in Visayas and Mindanao. Pryce Gases, owned by Pryce Corporation, a publicly-listed company, attained P9.2 billion in sales from 210,000 metric tons and P1.25 billion in net profit in 2017, up 11% and 29% respectively. For 2018, it is projecting to do P12 billion revenues and P1.5 billion net profit. ‘Joyjoy’ as he is fondly called, shares about his adaptability and grit during challenging times and how he kept winning despite his company’s corporate rehabilitation in 2004-2015 . Q1. You were a very small player in LPG but now has nearly 30% of the VISMIN market. What strategy worked for you as a latecomer/challenger? A1: First, we made sure that we had the proper infrastructure and…
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Q&A with Marketing Guru Pet Bautista on Turning Around Brands

Q&A with Marketing Guru Pet Bautista on Turning Around Brands

interviews, Q&A
Q1: You have been president or managing director of San Miguel Brewery, Kraft, URC and many other companies, then you shifted to the government as president of Philippine International Trading Corporation (PITC) - Pharma.   I understand you were able to turnaround PITC, ("a consistently profit-challenged" government company) within your 14-month stay. What issues plagued PITC and how did you turnaround PITC? A: PITC Pharma, or PPI is the only government owned pharmaceutical company which formerly owned Botika ng Bayan (BNB), which spearheaded the drive to promote and encourage the use of generic pharmaceutical products at low prices. Unfortunately with the entry of more pharmacies that focused primarily on generics, like the Generics Pharmacy, Generika, even Watsons; with their advertising budgets (PPI had none), consumers went to these competitors instead.…
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Why Businesses Fail by Josiah Go

Articles
There was a frantic call one morning. The man on the other side reminded me that we met in one of the marketing and innovation conferences he attended where I, together with some colleagues from Mansmith and Fielders, Inc. spoke. He then pleaded I should make time to meet him the same day - - his wife was about to leave him and the future of his kids was in danger because his business was about to collapse. I was his immediate hope! Mentoring SME businessmen from different industries on how to turnaround their failing enterprise is one of the things I have been doing as an advocacy. It has given me two opposite poles of emotions - a lot of joy seeing some businesses improve, but sadness realizing that…
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Q&A with Banyan (Boston) Partner Dr. Joshua Baron on Coaching Family Businesses

Q&A with Banyan (Boston) Partner Dr. Joshua Baron on Coaching Family Businesses

interviews, Q&A
Q1: Your company deals mostly with generational transitions.  What are some issues confronting family businesses that are usually overlooked by families? To their credit, most of the family business leaders we meet think a lot about succession. The vast majority are very interested in having what they have built continue into the next generation. More than anything else, the senior generation tends to focus on who is going to replace them in their current role. And there is no question that it is essential to find the right person to lead the business in the next generation. At the same time, that focus on identifying “the one” sometimes gets in the way of addressing other essential issues. For example, one of the most important decisions that each generation makes is…
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Q&A with Mondelez Southeast Asia Group Marketing Director Pamela Takai on Being a Young Market Master Awardee (YMMA)

Q&A with Mondelez Southeast Asia Group Marketing Director Pamela Takai on Being a Young Market Master Awardee (YMMA)

interviews, Q&A
Q1: Prior to Mondelez, you were with Unilever, first as country brand manager, then regional brand manager, then global brand manager. Can you tell us what were the most challenging parts of each of these brand positions and why? A: At the heart of these roles is the privilege to make a brand more valuable to the business and the consumers after your term.  There comes the usual challenge of competitive pressure, stagnant/declining sales, weakening equity and so on. But a significant part of the challenge would be beyond marketing, but also on personal leadership.  During my first role as brand manager, I was very young then and handling a mega billion peso brand that faced immense competitive onslaught and business pressures. The most difficult, and yet eventually rewarding, was…
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Q&A with Rustan’s Donnie Tantoco III on Working with Loved Ones and Turning Around A Heritage Brand

Q&A with Rustan’s Donnie Tantoco III on Working with Loved Ones and Turning Around A Heritage Brand

interviews, Q&A
Q1: You put up the first hypermarket in the Philippines, Shopwise, and while most supermarkets just provided express lanes for those buying a few pieces, Shopwise created the exclusive Elite lane designed to save time as well as reward volume buyers with free snacks. You also have price checkers in skateboard. I really like these ideas, can you share with our readers the thought process behind these ideas? We were the first retailer to introduce a mass-based loyalty program in the country known as the WiseCard.  We found inspiration in many successful loyalty programs in the world, most notably Tesco’s.   We learned that the value of any loyalty program is in the wealth of information you can get on customer buying behavior.    We quickly developed our own loyalty data-mining tool,…
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